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VIDEO: How to Choose a Knife

VIDEO: How to Choose a Knife

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November 11, 2011

By

Ali Rosen, Daily Meal Video

The French Culinary Institute explains which knife is best for every situation

How to Choose a Knife

The French Culinary Institute explains which knife is best for every situation

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  • How to Choose a Knife 3:44 mins

Ali Rosen

Knife


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Confessions of a Foodie

How to clean and cook nopales (cactus) is easy and once you learn the trick, you'll never use jarred cactus again.

Once you have removed the needles (I call them "thorns" in the video because if you're not paying attention when you handle them, they can prick!), give them a quick rinse under cool running water than cut them up. I was using these for salad so I opted to dice them but you can also slice them into 1-inch by ¼-inch long strips (like they are in the jarred variety).

First slice them lengthwise in ½-inch thick strips. You can see in this photo how small these cactus paddles are. Tender!

Turn them and slice them again to make ½-inch diced pieces.

You're going to want to give these guys a rinse. Have you ever cut aloe vera? Know the sticky, thick substance that oozes out that you use for burns? It's nectar and it can get a bit sticky and slimy so to minimize, I like to rinse these guys before I cook them.

Into a pot they go. Add enough water to cover (they'll float) and toss in a big jalepeño, a bit of onion and garlic and some salt and you're set.

Fifteen minutes later and you've got tender, al dente nopales. Just drain them and give them a quick rinse and they're ready to eat as is, throw into a salad, scramble with eggs, or add to a taco. Truly delicious and nutritious. Give 'em a whirl and let me know what you think.


Watch the video: Choose. A Choose Your Own Adventure Video (November 2021).