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Beyond Beef: 10 Surprising — and Healthy — Burger Alternatives

Beyond Beef: 10 Surprising — and Healthy — Burger Alternatives


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Our safari-like guide to burger meats that are healthy alternatives to standard 80/20 beef

These healthy burger swaps will have you asking, "What's beef?"

There are a few things you can look at in this world that make you think, “Wow, that’s horribly American.” One of the best examples of this is the cheeseburger.

Click here for 10 Surprising but Healthy Burger Alternatives.

In our list of the 101 Best Burgers in America, The Daily Meal’s Dan Myers writes:

“In a recent interview, meat-blending master Pat LaFrieda shared some of the key characteristics of the foundation of a great burger: the patty. LaFrieda has found that ‘An eight-ounce burger, inch-thick, is perfect for a barbecue — it can get a good sear without overcooking it.’ What it’s actually made of, or not made of, matters, too; the butcher likes to keep it an all-beef affair and thinks that mixing in additions such as beans and red peppers makes it ‘taste like meatloaf. It no longer tastes like a burger.’ Finally, not all meat blends are created equal, and he warned us that the meat-to-fat ratio should be 80/20 because ‘Anything else is a marketing ploy.’”

Not every burger is a gut-crunching two all-beef patties, with special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, and onions on a sesame seed bun. Not every burger is beef. There is an increasingly large camp of nutrition-conscious folk, in fact, who say that beef isn’t as healthy as we once thought it was. Many people cite its potential to cause cancer and high levels of fat as reasons not to eat beef. An example of high-fat beef is the previously mentioned (and calorically dense) 80/20 lean-to-fat ratio of beef that most burgers thrive on.

For comparison’s sake, we’ve listed the nutrition information for 10 exotic, surprising alternatives to the standard American all-beef patty (each at four ounces or a serving size very close to four ounces). A four-ounce serving of 80/20 ground beef has about 287 calories including 23 grams of fat and 20 grams of protein.

All of the following healthy beef alternatives have more protein than they do fat, immediately making them more tempting burger options than our beloved 80/20. The real question, however, is: Can you stomach these rather exotic meats served grilled and sandwiched between two buns?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Are Beyond Burgers and Impossible Burgers Healthier Than Meat?

Some people have pitched meatless burgers as healthy alternatives to beef. Here, we explore if that argument holds up.

If you have yet to try a meatless burger, such as the Impossible Burger or the Beyond Burger, just wait: They’re skyrocketing in popularity and can be spotted on menus around the country, from sit-down restaurants to fast-food spots.

The share price for Beyond Meat, the company behind the Beyond Burger, increased 600 percent in the six weeks following the company’s initial public offering in spring 2019, according to Bloomberg. The price has bounced around during its first year and is now trading at about $126 per share, compared with around $235 at the peak, according to Market Watch.

The coronavirus has also been good for the plant-based meat business. According to Bloomberg, the coronavirus lockdown created a 264 percent jump in sales for the faux-meat category, likely due in part to people stocking up before quarantine, as well as shortages of meats like pork and beef.

And while Beyond Meat and Impossible Foods are the two best-known brands, others like Tyson Foods, Nestlé Sweet Earth, Before the Butcher, Moving Mountains, and Hormel Foods are trying to get a piece of the meat-free market, too, according to Nation’s Restaurant News.

Some of these lesser-known meat-free burger brands, though, are experiencing hurdles. For one, a Dutch court recently ruled that Nestlé can’t call its burgers “Incredible” in Europe, because the name is too similar to its rival “Impossible Burgers,” which may confuse customers, the news outlet Food Processing reports.

Regardless of which meatless burger rises to the top, it’s important to know that these aren’t traditional veggie burgers — they were designed to emulate meat’s texture, appearance, and taste and, as a result, have gotten the seal of approval from many meat eaters. “While most of these burgers are vegan, they are likely more appealing to omnivores who are looking for ways to cut back on their intake of animal products while still enjoying a similar texture and taste,” says Kelli McGrane, RD, the Denver-based founder of Kelli McGrane Nutrition.

In fact, research done by The NPD Group, an analytics company, found that almost 90 percent of people who purchased meatless burgers weren’t vegetarian or vegan.

Some people prefer these burgers because they’re better for the environment. “No doubt, reducing our intake of red meat is a choice we should all consider to lessen our carbon footprint and embrace sustainability goals since red meat production has significant environmental impacts,” says Allison J. Stowell, RD, who is with Guiding Stars, a company that labels food as nutritious, and is based in Bethel, Connecticut.

Still, some scientists are conflicted over whether these meatless companies should really be touting themselves as the most environmentally friendly option, NBC reports. That’s because they’re processing these patties at a plant, which still creates a carbon footprint.

Other folks are in it for the health benefits that come with reducing the amount of red meat in the diet. But are these burgers actually healthier?


Watch the video: Beyond Meat Бейонд Мит захватывает мясную индустрию. Русская озвучка (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Jaap

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  2. Hahkethomemah

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  3. Aldrich

    Huy, people, read the article. Not to say that it is superbly straight, but not fiehnya either. +2.



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