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16 Most Expensive Celebrity's Kid Birthday Parties (Slideshow)

16 Most Expensive Celebrity's Kid Birthday Parties (Slideshow)

Learn how the stars spoil their kids on their special days

Most of us can’t even remember our second birthday and Suri, now 7, probably didn’t either, but Katie Holmes and then hubby, Tom Cruise spent $100,000 for hers. The couple dished out $17,000 on fresh flowers, $45,000 on catering from Wolfgang Puck, and filled the room with 1,000 butterflies. The cake alone cost a whopping $5,000 and they spent $230 at Little Sprinkles bakery in Los Angeles just on cupcakes. Suri Cruise had another over-the-top bash for her fifth birthday party with a budget of over $20,000! This girl seriously gets it all. Pre-split, TomKat hired professional actors to dress up as favorite children’s characters, and had a load of animals, including giraffes and elephants to entertain her guests. Who needs a stuffed animal as a birthday gift when you can play with the real thing at your birthday party?!

Suri Cruises’ $100,000 Second Birthday Party

Most of us can’t even remember our second birthday and Suri, now 7, probably didn’t either, but Katie Holmes and then hubby, Tom Cruise spent $100,000 for hers. Who needs a stuffed animal as a birthday gift when you can play with the real thing at your birthday party?!

Taylor Armstrong’s $60,000 Tea Party

Taylor Armstrong of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills went all out for her daughter’s fourth birthday party. The $60,000 party, planned by Dana Wilkey, known for her lavish celebrity-driven events, was held at the Houdini mansion in the Laurel Canyon area. It was a tea party fit for a queen complete with floating teapots holding flowers, a ridiculous teacake and cupcakes on amazing china.

Tori Spelling and Dean McDermott’s Ladybug Luncheon

When Tori Spelling and Dean McDermott’s daughter turned one, they celebrated with a ladybug-themed party designed by event planner Jo Gartin of Love Luck and Angels. Sounds quaint enough, but of course it didn’t stop there. There was a ladybug insect zoo, a create-your-own-potted-plant station, cookie-decorating activities, and pony rides. To top it all off, a live performance by her son’s, favorite band, The Jumpitz. Too bad the birthday girl’s silk white dress was ruined when she dove into the cake.

Usher and Tameka’s Aladdin Themed Extravaganza

Like, we all loved (or still do love) Aladdin and some of our humble birthdays even included the dashing thief in the theme. But Usher and Tameka took the Aladdin theme up a notch for the first birthday of Usher's second son, Naviyd Raymond. They hired a party planning service to execute it, complete with magic carpet seating, camel rides, face painting, henna tattoos, and more. Sounds better than the Disney movie.

The Beckham’s $187,000 Birthday Playhouse

Entertainment/thinkstock

To celebrate their son Brooklyn’s 6th birthday, David and Victoria Beckham spent $187,000 on a custom-built playhouse (just a playhouse, not a real house). Get this, there is already a separate play castle located on the Beckham's estate. In some parts of the world that can buy a legit house. Music at a birthday party is one thing, and live music is another thing. Having the extremely popular boy band The Wanted perform is on a completely different level. The Beckham’s middle son, Romeo, had just that at his 10th birthday bash. The Wanted met all Romeo's pals and posed for photos. Now how could you even put a price on that (or just a meager $125,000)? The Beckham’s have gotten into the habit of holding lavish parties for their children. There was no exception for baby Harper’s first birthday. They spent over $100,000 on the super girlie celebration, including pink cuddly toys, pony rides, cupcakes and even pink rabbits roaming around. Rabbits don’t even come in that color!

Pink’s Sesame Street Themed Birthday

Some of us grew up with Sesame Street, but Pink’s daughter partied with Sesame Street for her second birthday. The themed party was complete with Cookie Monster and Elmo characters. The rockin’ guestlist included Sandra Bullock, Selma Blair and their sons.

Charlize Theron’s Petting Zoo Party

iStock/Thinkstock

Petting zoos are always fun, but imagine when one is in the backyard of your Hollywood Hills mansion for your birthday. Well, little Jackson didn’t have to imagine. For his second birthday, mom Charlize Theron threw a bash with a petting zoo of farm animals, including a pony, and tons of balloons. To rent a ho-hum petting zoo with two ponies for only two hours is at least $475; so imagine what this superstar mama paid!

Beyoncé and Jay-Z’s $200,000 Jungle Island Party

Let’s face it, if we could have any celebrities for parents, we’d probably opt for music sensations Beyoncé and Jay-Z. Lucky for Blue Ivy, they are her parents;so lucky that for her second birthday, the two megastars rented a wildlife park/botanical garden called Jungle Island, in Miami, Fla. If they spent $200,000 on her first birthday, you could only imagine how much they dropped for her second.

Gavin Rossdale and Gwen Stefani’s $15,000 Backyard Bash

Many of us have probably had a birthday or two at home, just not a $15,000 birthday. In 2010, Gavin Rossdale and Gwen Stefani dished out $15,000 for their son Kingston's fourth birthday party at their home.. Kate Beckinsale, David and Victoria Beckham, and their kids were among the 100 guests who gorged on burgers, hot dogs, chicken fingers, fries, tacos, quesadillas, cotton candy, and a sumptuous birthday cake. They arranged activities like face painting, a bouncy castle, superhero characters, balloon art, actual birds, and more. Sounds better than the “havewayless” backyard bash.

Jessica Simpson’s Carnival Party

Getty Images/Thinkstock

Carnivals are practically the happiest places on Earth. That’s probably why Jessica Simpson recreated one for her daughter Maxwell's first birthday. She took the carnival theme to the next level with various food stations serving lemonade, hot dogs, fries, popcorn, snow cones, cookies, cotton candy, along with a DJ spinning 70s and 80s tunes, face-painting, balloons, swimming, and swinging and playing on the backyard jungle gym.

Kourtney Kardashian’s Whimsical Garden Party

First birthdays are meant to be magical, but Kourtney Kardashian took that idea and ran with it, creating a whimsical garden party bash for her daughter Penelope's first birthday. The lavish experience was held at Kris Jenner’s Los Angeles mansion and apparently involved a little piglet, a horse dressed as a unicorn, and some 30 big pink and white balloons coming in at about $150 a pop. Unicorn, enough said.

Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie’s $20,000 Princess Party

Princess themed parties will never be played-out, especially when you have an infinite budget like Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt do. The Jolie-Pitts did it up for their daughter Zahara’s princess-themed birthday party. There is no telling what princessy things you can get with $20,000. Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie also organized $7,000 a luxury river cruise on the Seine in France for Pax’s seventh birthday. What a cultured little lad. Good thing balloons and cake made an appearance or we would forget the birthday was for a kid.

Puff Daddy’s Outrageous Birthday Celebrations

Puff Daddy’s (or P. Diddy) younger son, Christian, got an over-the-top trip to Vegas for his 12th birthday. He and his friends traveled in style in a black tour van for a three-day birthdaypalooza, seeing the sights and chowing down on a custom cake as tall as the birthday boy. , Puffy’s other son Justin was gifted a $360,000 Maybach for his 16th birthday, and that was just the beginning. Justin’s party featured performances by famous artists Nicki Minaj, Fabolous, Jim Jones, Juelz Santana, G-Dep and Trey Songz. Money knows no bounds, clearly.

Phaedra and Apollo’s Water Park Birthday

Any reality TV junkie knows that the wives of The Real Housewives franchise do everything on a larger than life scale. Phaedra and Apollo from The Real Housewives of Atlanta threw baby Ayden’s first birthday bash at the water park. Of course just one cake wasn’t enough, the one-year-old needed twelve.

Nicole Richie’s Tree House Social Club Party

Nicole Richie held Harlow's 3rd birthdayat the Tree House Social Club, an upscale club in Los Angeles created for tots. This kiddie social club is an enormous indoor play space that runs $2,500 for a party for 50 people that generally include body glimmer, arts and crafts, and a popcorn machine. Wonder if little Harlow played in a VIP section.

Geri Halliwell’s Alice in Wonderland Party

Even Alice would be envious of Geri Halliwell’s daughter Bluebell’s magical Alice in Wonderland 2nd birthday party. The elegant festivities, which took place in a 16th-century mansion, highlighted lop-eared bunnies, enormous stuffed toys, and white horse chess pieces. Bluebell came dressed to impress as a lovely little fairy princess.


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Juvenile Detention – A Cry For Help

Unless you have a child – or know a child who is “at-risk” you don’t give it much thought. We read a lot about gangs and the violence that comes from it be we don’t understand why it happens or about the kids that get caught up in in it. The violence has increased so much over the years and the court system that is supposed to take care of it – can’t – it so the easiest thing to do is to either look the other way, or lock them up and get them off the street. What they don’t do is get them the help they need at a time where some of them can be saved. Juvenile courts are too chaotic. The don’t have the manpower or the resources adult courts have. Many crimes can’t be proven. Witnesses don’t show up. The reschedule court dates so often the people involved give up and don’t show up. When that happens the case is dismissed. Finally the kids are old enough to push over to adult court and have them tried there. So many of these kids are crying out for help and no one gives a crap. Case loads are so heavy they don’t have time.

If you live in a city that has a lot of gang activity, the kids who don’t have parents who end up in foster care also end up getting sucked into the life of a gang because at least now they have people in their life who care about them. Many of these people came from the same broken homes. They know how that feels. This cycle keeps churning out people who have to survive somehow. They don’t have educations. They can’t get good jobs. So, for them, crime pays. They start making regular visits to juvenile court, but there is no help. If they had been helped their life could have been different. ‘

States have gone back and forth over when it is okay to try kids as adults, especially when they do adult type crimes. Finally they have released the harm it causes to keep them in solitary confinement. Why anyone thinks it isn’t harmful to adults is beyond me. Maybe because by that time most of them have lives that are already ruined. To ruin someone so young with isolation gives that minor no chance. It’s such a shame that it had to take Kalief Browder committing suicide when he got out, to wake “them” up from the outcry from the public. America won’t even admit we keep keep adults in solitary for the decades we do. We don’t torture inmates they say.

It is easy to see that the way we deal minors only makes certain that when they get out, they will be full fledged criminals because they have no concept of how to live. They have more than likely never experienced anything close to having a normal life. I say “more than likely” because there has been a greater trend toward children coming from “good” homes and still deciding that the life of a “gangsta” has more appeal and excitement. But just like the sentences given out to older criminals, those children are looked at as having more promise and worth rehabilitating and get more breaks within the system. What helps is they have family support who show up at court hearings and typically hire real attorneys who have gone over their cases and planned a strategy so they don’t end up in prison at 16. Most juvenile offenders don’t get to see their attorney until the are sitting at a desk in front of the judge who will decide whether they stay in the juvenile system or proceed to prison.

If they go to prison they are subject to the same system as adults, which means, no rehabilitation and being subjected to adult predators. They come out with a felony record they will never escape from. Education becomes extremely hard to get and their spiral down happens quickly. The law isn’t set up to benefit minors. Juvenile courts are not allowed to consider why the child is there. What is his background? They can only look at the offense. But where do these kids come from? Why did it get to the point wher3e it became hopeless? Why wasn’t the child helped when there was plenty of time to do it, but feet were dragged and nothing was done?

These kids became a lost society, kept out of view. They eventually became found a home in prison with the same people they were with on the outside friends back with friends. They never had anyone who cared so they gravitated to the only people who loved them, people like themselves. Of course there are exceptions. There are kids that just seem determined ruin any chance they had. They go against what their parents tried to provide for them who don’t understand what they did wrong or couldn’t see in time to fix. Maybe there was nothing that could be done. But I want to talk about those who had no choice. Those who were born into a life that pushed them into a life of crime because it was all they knew.

I write to several inmates about their life and how they feel about where they are. I want to tell you about one who recently confided in me:

“I want to explain the way culture and the environment I lived in all my life formed my outlook. Blacks are not the only ones being racially targeted. Growing up I remember if white people in cop cars saw you they were going to stop you. I remember that no matter what, you would be searched. Driving, they’d pull you over. It didn’t matter if there was a reason to pull you over. If you ran and they caught you they’d beat you, so you ran faster and you didn’t get caught. Staying there to find out meant you would probably go to jail. Innocence is not a factor. Never was, and it still isn’t.

I’m from the ghetto. There were foothills nearby. At times we’d see the KKK burning crosses in front of black people’s houses. That stopped in the 80’s. In 1992 there were the LA riots because Rodney King was beat up by cops. Only when I received my first prison sentence and reached my 20’s did I learn about the laws. They weren’t even supposed to be allowed to stop and search us for no reason, but the law never seems to apply to the police.

In prison, on paper, they say there are rehabilitation programs. They say that, but in reality there aren’t any. I wanted to go to school. I wanted to learn a better of living but I soon learned that it didn’t mean me. There was no rehabilitation for people like me.

There is a mentality you learn growing up and living like that. The chances of people escaping that life is small. Most don’t. I’m one of the ones who didn’t escape. all those programs for “at-risk” kids never existed back then. I don’t know many kids benefit from them today. Everyone went to jail. Punks went to jail. I accepted that mentality. It was all I knew. It didn’t scare me. In fact, jail was a vacation from an abusive home. Violence was normal to me, so gangbanging was no biggy.

When you see very few people you know not go to jail and many of them die, it become normal. When I got out of jail the first time all my good intentions faded in a second. I got out wanting to do good, but when you encounter a hugh problem, who you really are comes out. Your intentions disappear. It’s engraved in you.

So you ask, why did I go back to prison? Why is it that if I knew the consequences, why am I here? Because that is how it was. I had no place else to go. It is the only experience I knew.”

This man was raised in a violent home where he got beat every day. There was violence all around him. He didn’t have parents who made sure he had good food every day and went to school. There was no Tooth Fairy and Easter Bunny. There were no family Thanksgiving dinners and birthday parties. The kids I grew up with all had these things. We had families that cared. I’m sure violence existed but it never entered in my life. If you had his life what would you do? You would bond with other kids who had a life who could relate to yours. They were your family. You never really knew there was any other kind of life you could experience. There was no choice. You would end up in prison.

There many kids who don’t have families. Maybe the state took them away because of drugs and neglect. Many of the parents died and there was no place for the kids to go. We have all heard horror stories. The juvenile system is overloaded with kids who have no place to go. They get shifted between multiple foster home which are also rife with drug abuse and violence. There aren’t enough case workers who can take the time to care even if they wanted to. Nothing is done in a timely manner. Even when there is someone who is willing to take these kids in, the paperwork is insurmountable. The kids get lost in the system. They find themselves in and out of court until eventually they get old enough to prosecute. One more person locked up. Another one to take his place.

80% of those incarcerated went through the foster care system. Those are scary numbers. Doesn’t that tell you that if there were a better way of dealing with these throw away kids the prison population would go down? Isn’t it time something better should be done? Haven’t we had enough generations of throwaway kids?

Here is an excellent article about what happens to kids we lock up. Why Do We Still Put Kids In Shackles When They Go To Trial


Watch the video: Ρουτίνα. Πάρτι Γενεθλίων (January 2022).